ANR Wikipedia

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ANRSeptember 20 marks the birth anniversary of Akkineni Nageswara Rao. The legendary actor was a stalwart owing to his dedication, professionalism and perseverance.

He analysed his weaknesses and modified himself constantly, which is why his stardom stayed intact September 20 marks the birth anniversary of Akkineni Nageswara Rao. The legendary actor was a stalwart owing to his dedication, professionalism and perseverance.

He analysed his weaknesses and modified himself constantly, which is why his stardom stayed intact

We need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.”-Max de Pree

Akkineni Nageswara Rao (1923 – 2014) is a name so familiar, and treasured for the Telugu people that any introductory reference is superfluous. He was a visage of sophistication and decency as imprinted in the minds of millions of Telugu people for two generations.

ANR’s life was a nothing-to-everything drama. He was lucky to be at the right place at the right time. His invaluable contribution to Telugu cinema started with his decision to shift endeavours as an actor to Hyderabad in the 1960’s. Saradhi Studios was the only infrastructure available then in Hyderabad, with comparatively limited facilities.

By 1975, ANR took the major leap of building Annapurna Studios against many odds, investing a great deal of his earnings. The Studio was opened by the then President of India, Fakruddin Ali Ahmed.

Indian cinema has seen actors of comparable talent with Akkineni Nageswara Rao, but what distinguished him as a stalwart was his dedication, professionalism and perseverance. The way he digested his failures and enjoyed successes is the exclusive forte of ANR, as he proved the Cassandras wrong every time. ‘Devadasu’ (1953) was considered thoroughly beyond ANR’s abilities.

But it is now history as to what a stupendous success the film based on Sarat Chandra Chatterjee’s Bengali novel with the same name, was. He played the poet laureate Ujjain Kalidas in ‘Mahakavi Kalidasu’ (1960). He was the singer-poet Jayadev of Orissa in ‘Bhakta Jayadeva’ (1961). He was also the great political philosopher Kautilya in ‘Chanakya Chandragupta’ (1977).

The sheer diversity of all these characters has made ANR an iconic trans-regional cultural entity. He was an atheist in his personal life and despite that; he convincingly portrayed roles of deeply religious personalities like Vipranarayana, Tukaram and Kumbhara. The two films ‘Sudigundalu’ (1968) and ‘Maro Prapancham’ (1970), ANR co-produced with director Adurthi Subba Rao under Chakravarthi Chitra banner were experimental films with a thematic accent on declining values in society.

For example, ‘Maro Prapancham’ was about a few young men trying to build a casteless and classless society. However, both the films did not fare well at the box-office. ANR said he made them as part of his social responsibility to disseminate values.ANR could analyse his weaknesses quite well and he modified himself so that his ascent as a star was ever intact.

He made social themes his prime area of work. Unhesitatingly, he used to quip that it would be farcical to imagine himself in roles like Duryodhana and Ravana, as such roles were best suited to NTR who had the requisite physical features for the characters.Self-analysing, ANR admitted that his strength was that he knew his deficiencies (‘sweeyalopaalu’ as he coined the word in Telugu).

In his personal estimate, the role of the schizophrenic scholar he played in ‘Batasaari’ (1961), based on Sarat’s novel ‘Badi Deedi’ is the most complicated character he ever played.  In ‘Rojulu Maraayi’, ANR was a progressive rural young man infusing reform into the rural set up. In ‘Devadasu’ and ‘Prem Nagar’ (1971), he was the heir apparent of a royal family.

Portraying an amazing range of characters, each one totally different from the other in the form of social status and sophistication, seemed like a cake walk for ANR. Having acted on stage, ANR was not without some musical sense and awareness. This was of immense use for him while portraying roles as a performing musician in films like ‘Jayabheri’ (1959).

The repertoire of every noted director for 40 years – from 1950 to 1990 – was incomplete without directing him.   LV Prasad, P Pullaih, Vedantam Raghavayya, K Raghavendra Rao and A Kodanda Ramireddi are some eminent directors who made films with ANR in the lead role.

The galore of awards he received during the long acting career include – the Padmasri (1968), Padma Bhushan (1988), Padma Vibhushan (2011), Dadasaheb Phalke (1991) awards among others. Though he was a producer for several films made under Annapurna Pictures, he never wielded the megaphone as a director.

Apart from Annapurna Studios, he established Annapurna International School of Film Studies in 2011. Interestingly, ANR even tried his hand at writing a few books like ‘Nenu-Na Jeevitham’ and ‘Nenu Choosina America’, penning his reflections about his personal life and achievements.

Akkineni Nageswara Rao was born at Venkata Raghavapuram near Gudivada in Krishna District on the September 20, 1923. He passed away on January 22, 2014 from cancer. His wife, Annapurna died in 2011 after prolonged illness. In all, he acted in 256 films. From ‘Seetharama Jananam’ (1944) to ‘Manam’ (2014), it was a seven decade long saga of a hero, eventful at every turn, every junction and every milestone.

As per Akkineni Foundation of America, a postal stamp is to be brought out in memory of ANR on his birth anniversary. ANR will be the first Indian actor to be honoured in this manner.

By:Rajagopal TiruvayapatiWe need to give each other the space to grow, to be ourselves, to exercise our diversity. We need to give each other space so that we may both give and receive such beautiful things as ideas, openness, dignity, joy, healing, and inclusion.”-Max de Pree

Akkineni Nageswara Rao (1923 – 2014) is a name so familiar, and treasured for the Telugu people that any introductory reference is superfluous. He was a visage of sophistication and decency as imprinted in the minds of millions of Telugu people for two generations.

ANR’s life was a nothing-to-everything drama. He was lucky to be at the right place at the right time. His invaluable contribution to Telugu cinema started with his decision to shift endeavours as an actor to Hyderabad in the 1960’s. Saradhi Studios was the only infrastructure available then in Hyderabad, with comparatively limited facilities.

By 1975, ANR took the major leap of building Annapurna Studios against many odds, investing a great deal of his earnings. The Studio was opened by the then President of India, Fakruddin Ali Ahmed.

Indian cinema has seen actors of comparable talent with Akkineni Nageswara Rao, but what distinguished him as a stalwart was his dedication, professionalism and perseverance. The way he digested his failures and enjoyed successes is the exclusive forte of ANR, as he proved the Cassandras wrong every time. ‘Devadasu’ (1953) was considered thoroughly beyond ANR’s abilities.

But it is now history as to what a stupendous success the film based on Sarat Chandra Chatterjee’s Bengali novel with the same name, was. He played the poet laureate Ujjain Kalidas in ‘Mahakavi Kalidasu’ (1960). He was the singer-poet Jayadev of Orissa in ‘Bhakta Jayadeva’ (1961). He was also the great political philosopher Kautilya in ‘Chanakya Chandragupta’ (1977).

The sheer diversity of all these characters has made ANR an iconic trans-regional cultural entity. He was an atheist in his personal life and despite that; he convincingly portrayed roles of deeply religious personalities like Vipranarayana, Tukaram and Kumbhara. The two films ‘Sudigundalu’ (1968) and ‘Maro Prapancham’ (1970), ANR co-produced with director Adurthi Subba Rao under Chakravarthi Chitra banner were experimental films with a thematic accent on declining values in society.

For example, ‘Maro Prapancham’ was about a few young men trying to build a casteless and classless society. However, both the films did not fare well at the box-office. ANR said he made them as part of his social responsibility to disseminate values.ANR could analyse his weaknesses quite well and he modified himself so that his ascent as a star was ever intact.

He made social themes his prime area of work. Unhesitatingly, he used to quip that it would be farcical to imagine himself in roles like Duryodhana and Ravana, as such roles were best suited to NTR who had the requisite physical features for the characters.Self-analysing, ANR admitted that his strength was that he knew his deficiencies (‘sweeyalopaalu’ as he coined the word in Telugu).

In his personal estimate, the role of the schizophrenic scholar he played in ‘Batasaari’ (1961), based on Sarat’s novel ‘Badi Deedi’ is the most complicated character he ever played.  In ‘Rojulu Maraayi’, ANR was a progressive rural young man infusing reform into the rural set up. In ‘Devadasu’ and ‘Prem Nagar’ (1971), he was the heir apparent of a royal family.

Portraying an amazing range of characters, each one totally different from the other in the form of social status and sophistication, seemed like a cake walk for ANR. Having acted on stage, ANR was not without some musical sense and awareness. This was of immense use for him while portraying roles as a performing musician in films like ‘Jayabheri’ (1959).

The repertoire of every noted director for 40 years – from 1950 to 1990 – was incomplete without directing him.   LV Prasad, P Pullaih, Vedantam Raghavayya, K Raghavendra Rao and A Kodanda Ramireddi are some eminent directors who made films with ANR in the lead role.

The galore of awards he received during the long acting career include – the Padmasri (1968), Padma Bhushan (1988), Padma Vibhushan (2011), Dadasaheb Phalke (1991) awards among others. Though he was a producer for several films made under Annapurna Pictures, he never wielded the megaphone as a director.

Apart from Annapurna Studios, he established Annapurna International School of Film Studies in 2011. Interestingly, ANR even tried his hand at writing a few books like ‘Nenu-Na Jeevitham’ and ‘Nenu Choosina America’, penning his reflections about his personal life and achievements.

Akkineni Nageswara Rao was born at Venkata Raghavapuram near Gudivada in Krishna District on the September 20, 1923. He passed away on January 22, 2014 from cancer. His wife, Annapurna died in 2011 after prolonged illness. In all, he acted in 256 films. From ‘Seetharama Jananam’ (1944) to ‘Manam’ (2014), it was a seven decade long saga of a hero, eventful at every turn, every junction and every milestone.

As per Akkineni Foundation of America, a postal stamp is to be brought out in memory of ANR on his birth anniversary. ANR will be the first Indian actor to be honoured in this manner.

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